APEC Cooperation for Earthquake Simulation
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ACES

ACES is a multi-lateral grand challenge science research cooperation of APEC (the Asia Pacific Economic Cooperation). The project is sponsored by Australia, China, Japan and USA and involves leading international earthquake simulation and prediction research groups.

ACES aims to develop realistic supercomputer simulation models for the complete earthquake generation process, thus providing a "virtual laboratory" to probe earthquake behavior. This capability will provide a powerful means to study the earthquake cycle, and hence, offers a new opportunity to gain an understanding of the earthquake nucleation process and precursory phenomena.

The project represents a grand scientific challenge because of the complexity of phenomena and range of scales from microscopic to global involved in the earthquake generation process. It is a coordinated international effort linking complementary nationally based programs, centres and research teams.

In 2003, it was agreed to work towards establishment of a frontier international research institute on simulating the solid earth named the international Solid Earth Virtual Research Observatory institute (iSERVO).

Events and Workshop Proceedings


Proceedings of ACES workshops containing papers, session summaries and overviews of national programs are available on-line as downloadable PDF files or in book form. Orders for book versions can be placed with the Administrator, ACES Executive Office. Full information on workshop organisation and participants is available on workshop home pages.

8th ACES International Workshop on Advances in Simulation of Multihazards, Maui, Hawaii, October 23-26, 2012 (Workshop homepage, Presentations)
ACES Workshop on Advances in Simulation of Multihazards, Maui, Hawaii, May 1-5, 2011 (Workshop homepage, Presentations)
7th ACES International Workshop October 3-8, 2010 in Hokkaido, Japan (homepage including abstract, Minutes of the ACES ISB Meeting, Group Photo)
6th ACES International Workshop May 11-16 2008, Cairns, Australia (homepage including abstract)
5th ACES International Workshop April 4-6, 2006 in Hawaii, USA (announcement)
4th ACES Workshop and iSERVO colloquium July 9-14, 2004, Beijing, China (homepage, announcement, extended abstracts)
3-rd ACES Working Group Meeting, June 2-6, 2003, Melbourne and Brisbane, Australia (home page, announcement, workshop papers, meeting program, presentations, iSERVO seed project)
3-rd ACES Workshop, 5 - 10 May 2002, Maui, Hawaii ( On-line proceedings, participants list, Agenda, on-line registration , presentations, download abstract and paper templates: word format, latex format, see also the photo gallery)
2-nd ACES Working Group Meeting, 29 July - 3 August, 2001, Maui Supercomputer Center, USA (participants list, Agenda, presentations; see also the photo gallery)
2-nd ACES Workshop, 15 - 20 October 2000, Tokyo and Hakone, Japan ( home page, on-line proceedings, proceedings book orders).
Inaugural ACES Workshop, 31 January - 5 February 1999, Brisbane and Noosa, Queensland, Australia (home page, on-line proceedings, meeting abstracts, proceedings book orders).
ACES Visitors Program: scheduling



Mission


to develop realistic numerical simulation models for the physics and dynamics of the complete earthquake generation process and to assimilate new earthquake observations into such models,
to foster collaboration between the relevant complementary programs of participating APEC member economies,
to foster development of the required research infrastructure and research programs.


Brief description


Earthquakes are one of the most costly and deadly natural disasters. APEC member economies are struck by the vast majority of the world's earthquakes and have a particularly high earthquake risk (see the world seismicity map). This has resulted in more than 800,000 deaths in APEC member economies of the approximately 1.3 million deaths associated with earthquakes this century.

The scientific method relies on development of a theoretical framework or simulation model describing nature. While no such model exists for the complete earthquake generation process, conceptual developments in understanding earthquake physics, numerical simulation methodology and advances in High Performance Computing offer the possibility to develop such models. The APEC Cooperation for Earthquake Simulation (ACES) would capitalize on this new opportunity and the complementary strengths of the earthquake research programs of individual APEC member economies.

It aims to develop numerical simulation models for the complete earthquake generation process (see a snapshot of a numerical earthquake simulation), to assimilate new earthquake observations into such models, to foster collaboration between the relevant programs of participating member economies, and to foster development of required research infrastructure and research programs.

Development of such simulation models represents a grand scientific challenge because of the complexity of phenomena and range of scales involved from microscopic to global (see the figure). The models would provide powerful new tools for studying earthquake precursory phenomena and the earthquake cycle. They would have direct application to earthquake hazard studies and earthquake engineering, and the potential to yield spin-offs in sectors such as mining, geophysical exploration, high performance computing, material science, engineering and geotechnical.

 

Detailed description


A more detailed description of ACES can be downloaded as PDF document (1.2 MB) or as Postscript document (1.5 MB). This document summarises the objectives, motivation, science plan, history and establishment, management structure, science working groups, activities and visitors program of ACES. ACES is managed in accordance with By-Laws (HTML or PDF) developed at the inaugural meeting of the International Science Board.

An overview of ACES research areas can be found here or an equivalent brochure may be downloaded as a PDF document (500 kB).

Posters overviewing ACES may also be downloaded as PDF document (4.3 MB).

The brochure and copies of posters may also be obtained by contacting The Administrator at the ACES Executive Office.


Working Groups

 

Participants

 

Member economies

Australia (originating economy), China, Japan, USA

International Science Board

Executive Director:   Professor John Rundle, Director, California Hazards Institute of the University of California; Professor of Physics, Geology and Engineering, University of California
Australia:   Dr Huilin Xing, Earth Systems Science Computational Centre
Canada: Dr Kristy Tiampo, Department of Earth Sciences, University of Western Ontario
China: Professor Xiang-chu Yin, Institute of Earthquake Prediction, China Earthquake Administration and Laboratory of Nonlinear Mechanics, Institute of Mechanics, Chinese Academy of Sciences
Chinese Taipei: Professor How-Wei Chen, Institute of Geophysics, National Central University, Chung-Li
Japan: Dr. Eiichi Fukuyama, National Research Institute for Earth Science and Disaster Prevention
USA: Andrea Donnellan, Ph.D., Deputy Manager, Earth and Space Sciences Division, NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory

Institutions/Groups/Centres


Australia
 

Earth Systems Science Computational Centre (ESSCC), The University of Queensland :

ESSCC, formerly named Queensland University Advanced Centre for Earthquake Studies (QUAKES), conducts research on the physics of earthquakes and solid earth processes from the micro to global scales using supercomputer simulation. Earthquake nucleation and fault behaviour is controlled by microscopic interactions and group behaviour of rock grains along faults. The QUAKES group of ESSCC is focussed on simulation based research to study the nonlinear physics of interacting fault systems and micro-mechanics of fault zones. Part of this work aims to fill a fundamental gap in the knowledge of the earthquake generation process by developing a microscopic based numerical simulation capability (LSMearth).

 
Solid Mechanics Group (CSIRO) and Centre for Industrial Solid Mechanics (UWA/CSIRO)
 
Geoscience Australia (GA)
 
Department of Education, Science and Training (DEST)
 

China
 

Institute of Earthquake Prediction, China Earthquake Administration:

The China Earthquake Administration has extensive observations of seismic precursory phenomena and the Institute of Earthquake Prediction has developed preliminary models for earthquake prediction in the months to one year time frame.

 
Laboratory of Nonlinear Mechanics (LNM), Institute of Mechanics, Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS)
 
Institute of Geophysics, China Earthquake Administration
 
Beijing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics
 
Peking University
 

Japan
 

Centre of Excellence for Predictability of the Evolution and Variation of the Multi-scale Earth System, Tokyo University:

A new integrated CoE for observational and computational earth science with the objective of building an advanced research and education sytem that can promote effectively study of future variations predictability of a multi-sphere earth system in which processes with different rules intertwine intricately in different space-time scales, based upon verification of necessity and randomness of the earth evolution process.

 

Research Organisation for Information Science and Technology (RIST):

Governmental organisation responsible for the national Earth Simulator Project in Japan under Science and Technology Agency to model earth processes (ocean, atmosphere, solid-earth).

 
Crustal Activity Modelling Program (CAMP):

Multi-institutional program within Japan's Earth Simulator Project. Institutions: Tokyo University, Earthquake Research Institute, Geographical Survey of Japan, Building Research Institute, National Research Institute for Earth Science and Natural Disaster Prevention. The Crustal Activity Modelling Program aims to develop models for the earthquake generation process and earthquake cycle at the crustal scale including quasi-static stress build-up and nucleation.
 
Strong Motion Modelling Program (SMMP):

Multi-institutional program within Japan's Earth Simulator Project. Institutions: Nagoya University, Kyushu University, Hokkaido University of Education, Meteorological Research Institute, and Chiba University. The Strong Motion Modelling Program aims to develop models for the earthquake generation process at the crustal scale including dynamic rupture and strong motion.
 

National GeoFEM Group:

The GeoFEM group conduct computational research and develop superparallel software associated with the solid-earth groups (CAMP and SMMP) within Japan's Earth Simulator Project. Institutions: RIST, STA, Yokohama National University, and the Institute of Physical and Chemical Research (RIKEN).

 

Science and Technology Agency (STA):

Governmental agency for science and technology in Japan that is responsible for the Earth Simulator Project.

 

USA
 
NASA-JPL (iSERVO, QuakeSim, RIVA, ServoGrid):

Earth and Space Sciences Division, NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology. See also NASA JPL Solid Earth Science Working Group and Space and Earth Sciences Directorate.
 
California Institute for Hazards Research

University of California Research Institute focussed on the understanding and prediction of natural hazards and the ways to reduce their impact on society.
 
Community Grids Lab, Indiana University
 
Southern California Earthquake Center (SCEC):

Multi-institutional center. Institutions: University of Southern California, California Institute of Technology, Columbia University, Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory, San Diego State University, UCLA, University of California San Diego, Scripps Institution of Oceanography, UC Santa Barbara, University of Nevada, US Geological Survey, NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory.
 
General Earthquake Models Group (GEM) (See also GEM/NPAC):

Multi-institutional multi-disciplinary national program. Institutions: Centre for Chaos and Complexity, Colorado University, University of California, Los Alamos National Laboratories, Stanford University, UC Santa Barbara, UCLA, USC, SCEC, San Diego Supercomputer Centre, Institute for Geophysics and Planetary Physics, Centre for Advanced Computing Research, NASA JPL, LLNL, Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory, Boston University, Brown University, Cornell University, Northeast Parallel Architectures Centre, Syracuse University, Worcester Polytechnic Institute, Massachusetts Institute of Technology. The GEM group is focussed on developing simulation models at the crustal scale with emphasis on the California interacting fault system.
 
Harvard U. Earthquake Modeling Group
 
Center for Nonlinear Earth Systems, Lamont Doherty Earth Institute
 
Seismological Laboratory, University of Nevada, Reno
 


Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation (APEC)

Industrial Science and Technology Working Group (ISTWG)

ACES Scientists Contact Lists

  Australia
  China
  Japan
  USA
  International



ACES Executive Director
Prof. John Rundle
California Hazards Institute of the University of California
University of California, Davis
Davis, CA 95616 USA
E-mail: rundle@cse.ucdavis.edu
Internet address: http://www.calhazards.org

 



ACES Executive Office
Earth Systems Science Computational Centre (ESSCC)
Level 8 - Sir James Foots Building (47A)
The University of Queensland
Brisbane, 4072, Qld, Australia
Tel: (61-7) 3346-4133
Fax: (61-7) 3346-4134
E-mail: admin@esscc.uq.edu.au
Internet address: http://www.esscc.uq.edu.au

 




Dr. Huilin Xing


Earth Systems Science Computational Centre (ESSCC)
Level 8 - Sir James Foots Building (47A)
The University of Queensland
Bribane, 4072, Australia
Tel: (61-7) 3346 4093
Fax: (61-7) 3346 4134
E-mail: h.xing@uq.edu.au



Prof. Xiang-Chu Yin


Institute of Earthquake Prediction, China Earthquake Administration and Laboratory of Nonlinear Mechanics,
Institute of Mechanics
Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS)
15 Zhong Guan Cun
Beijing 100080, P.R. China
Tel: +86-10 6252-8760
Fax: +86-10 6256-1284
E-mail: xcyin@public.bta.net.cn




Dr. Eiichi Fukuyama


National Research Institute for Earth Science and Disaster Prevention (NIED)
3-1 Tennodai, Tsukuba, Japan
Phone: +81-29-863-7604
Fax: +81-29-863-7610
EMail: fuku@bosai.go.jp



Andrea Donnellan, Ph.D.


Deputy Manager, Earth and Space Sciences Division
Mail Stop 183-335
NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory
4800 Oak Grove Drive
Pasadena, CA 91109-8099, USA
Phone: 818-354-4737
Fax: 818-393-6546
Email: Andrea.Donnellan@jpl.nasa.gov



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